This Day in History

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Dr Seuss was born!

We all grew up with Dr Seuss! Oh all Wonderful Places you will go!

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On this day in 1904, Theodor Geisel, better known to the world as Dr. Seuss, the author and illustrator of such beloved children’s books as “The Cat in the Hat” and “Green Eggs and Ham,” is born in Springfield, Massachusetts. Geisel, who used his middle name (which was also his mother’s maiden name) as his pen name, wrote 48 books–including some for adults–that have sold well over 200 million copies and been translated into multiple languages. Dr. Seuss books are known for their whimsical rhymes and quirky characters, which have names like the Lorax and the Sneetches and live in places like Hooterville.

The History Channel

and who remembers this? My kids certainly do!

 

So exactly how did Dr Seuss come to write Childrens’ Books?

In 1936, while He and his Companion was returning from an ocean voyage to Europe, the rhythm of the ship’s engines inspired the poem that became his first book,  “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.”

and from there, children all across the Nation have enjoyed Dr Seuss!

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The first children’s book that Geisel wrote and illustrated, “And to Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street,” was rejected by over two dozen publishers before making it into print in 1937. Geisel’s first bestseller, “The Cat in the Hat,” was published in 1957. The story of a mischievous cat in a tall striped hat came about after his publisher asked him to produce a book using 220 new-reader vocabulary words that could serve as an entertaining alternative to the school reading primers children found boring.

Other Dr. Seuss classics include “Yertle the Turtle,” “If I Ran the
Circus,” “Fox in Socks” and “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.”

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Some Dr. Seuss books tackled serious themes. “The Butter Battle Book” (1984) was about the arms buildup and nuclear war threat during Ronald Reagan’s presidency. “Lorax” (1971) dealt with the
environment.

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Many Dr. Seuss books have been adapted for television and film, including “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” and “Horton Hears a Who!” In 1990, Geisel published a book for adults titled “Oh, the Places You’ll Go” that became a hugely popular graduation gift for high school and college students.

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Geisel, who lived and worked in an old observatory in La Jolla, California, known as “The Tower,” died September 24, 1991, at age 87.

I pay my respects to a Man with a Dream and a Vision, that he
dedicated his life to the delight of Children everywhere!

You have Dreams and Visions, don’t waste time, make them happen.

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Have a Wonderful Day!

 

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One thought on “This Day in History

  1. I love Dr Seuss books they really are great for so many things, from reading times of learning to read, teaching rhyming, and fun ways to get a message across! What A great tribute in this post!

    Liked by 1 person

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